Locations

Martinsville

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Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • Sunday:
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 5:30pm
  • 10am - 5:30pm
  • 9:30am - 2pm
  • Closed

Info

  • 3109 East Church St
  • PO Box 5264
  • Martinsville VA
  • (276) 403-5430
  • martinsville@brrl.lib.va.us
  • Branch manager: Tammy Cope

Events

Map

History

Library service in the Martinsville and Henry County area began when a twenty member Martinsville Women’s Club conceived the idea to buy books to be circulated during the year 1913 and then donate them to form a library. It was located on the first floor of City Hall, moved to the second floor, and finally in 1928 the third floor. In 1931, local citizens formed the Library Association, charging $1.00 annually for membership rights.

At the end of World War II, Martinsville citizens organized a War Memorial Library Association, elected officers and trustees, and appointed committees to solicit donations and buy property. The Andes house on Church Street was purchased for $25,000 in 1946 and remodeled in 1949. By 1950, the library had over 6,000 volumes and a circulation of 13,000. In 1961, the Martinsville Memorial Library, Inc. was formed to raise money for a new building. About $150,000 had to be raised by civic organizations and individual contributors. In 1962, the Andes house was demolished to make way for the present building.

The new library was opened in 1963. This same building, with a few additions and some rearrangement, housed the library's collection for over twenty years. In 1974, the Collinsville Branch opened. In that same year, the Patrick County Branch joined, creating the Blue Ridge Regional Library system. In 1984, a seven-week capital campaign was initiated raising $1.5 million to build the regional headquarters. For 15 months, library operations moved to the Patrick Henry Mall. The newly refurbished and expanded headquarters building was dedicated on September 28, 1986. Four years later saw the addition of the Ridgeway Branch and two years after that, the Bassett Branch.

The Martinsville Branch offered its first public Internet workstation in the second half of 1996. Today, the library has patron workstations, children's computers and one parent/child workstation coming in the near future. The library now offers mobile printing,faxing, scanning, and streaming services.

Available Resources

Newspapers
  • Danville Register and Bee
  • Enterprise
  • Greensboro News and Record
  • Martinsville Bulletin
  • Richmond Times Dispatch
  • Roanoke Times
  • USA Today
  • Wall Street Journal
Magazines
  • American Legacy
  • Babybug
  • Bicycling
  • Black Enterprise
  • Booklist
  • Business Week
  • Civil War Times
  • Coin World
  • Computers in Libraries
  • Consumer Reports
  • Consumer Reports Buying Guide
  • Consumer Reports Money Adviser
  • Consumer Reports on Health
  • Cooking Light
  • Country Living
  • Cycle World
  • Ebony
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Field & Stream
  • Glamour
  • Good Housekeeping
  • Jet
  • Kiplingers Personal Finance
  • Library Journal
  • Library Sparks
  • Mailbox - Preschool Education
  • Mailbox Companion
  • Mens Health
  • Mother Earth News
  • Motor Trend
  • National Geographic
  • Parenting Early Years
  • Parenting School Years
  • People Weekly
  • Popular Mechanics
  • Popular Science
  • Prevention
  • Readers Digest
  • Road and Track
  • Rolling Stone
  • Saturday Evening Post
  • School Library Journal
  • Seventeen
  • Shape Magazine
  • Smart Computing
  • Smithsonian
  • Southern Living
  • Sports Illustrated
  • The Oprah Magazine
  • Time
  • US News & World Report
  • Vegetarian Times
  • Video Librarian
  • Virginia Living
  • Wall Street Journal Magazine
  • Wired
  • Womans Day
  • Womens Health
  • Writers Digest

Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • Sunday:
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • Closed

Info

  • 3969 Fairystone Park Highway
  • Bassett VA
  • (276) 629-2426
  • bassett@brrl.lib.va.us
  • Branch manager: Karen Barley

Events

Map

History

The Bassett Public Library had its start in 1939, when the Bassett Garden Club decided that the town needed a library. At a tea for interested citizens, almost 100 books were collected. The first location for the library was a room in the Stone Block, where Garden Club members took turns keeping the library open three afternoons a week.

From this location, the library was moved to two rooms over the old Kroger store. Mrs. B. F. Noland took over management of the library without pay. While the library was located over Kroger's a fire broke out in the building and badly damaged many of the library's small collection of books. Mrs. Noland, hunched over her precious books, frantically tried to erase smoke damage from page after page. She was assisted by members of the Club, who then gathered around a potbellied stove to lay plans for the building of a "real" library.

They found a new home for the library in the old elementary school which had recently been vacated. Mrs. Noland took over as full-time librarian, keeping the library open half a day.

By 1955, the handsome new Bassett Public Library building, located on a lot in North Bassett donated by Bassett Furniture Industries, was completed. The cost of the building, including the architect's fees and furnishings, was $53,388.72. The library was maintained, the books purchased, and the librarian's salary was paid over the years by an annual contribution from the United Fund and thru private donations. Mrs. Noland's health forced her to resign in 1959, and Mrs. G. W. Bassett stepped into her shoes. Later, the Henry County Board of Supervisors began contributing two-thirds of the amount needed to keep the library functioning.

By the late 1980's the Bassett Library had outgrown its walls. After a disastrous flood on Labor Day, 1987, plans were made to build an addition located above the flood plain. On November 1, 1988, the addition was completed, resulting in doubling of the size of the original building. The addition included The Virginia Room, dedicated to Shirley Brightwell Bassett, which housed extensive genealogical and historical records, a children's room, expanded shelf space, an office, and a storage area. Included in the addition was a small parking area as well.

In 1992 the Bassett Public Library became Bassett Branch Library of the Blue Ridge Regional Library System. This branch became the main genealogical facility for the area as well.

In 1996 a building directly across the street from the library which had been a dress shop was for sale. Some very forward looking individuals saw the possibility of the library to expand and separate the genealogical and historical records from the other books and services. The Board of Directors named a committee to lead a community effort to raise funds. Large donations were received from Bassett Furniture, Stanley Furniture, Patrick Henry Bank and the Henry County Board of Supervisors, as well as many donations, both large and small, from residents and patrons. This enabled the Bassett Branch Library to open its new building in December of 1998. The original Bassett Branch then became the Historical Center.

The Bassett Branch Library covers 6,000 square feet housing a collection of over 63,000 items. At the time of this writing, annual circulation numbers are over 30,000 with an average monthly patron attendance of about 4,000.

Available Resources

Newspapers
  • Enterprise
  • Martinsville Bulletin
  • Roanoke Times
  • Wall Street Journal
Magazines
  • Back Home
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • Consumer Reports
  • Country Woman
  • Essence
  • Family Fun
  • Family Handyman
  • People Weekly
  • Popular Mechanics
  • Southern Living
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Sports Illustrated for Kids
  • Taste of Home
  • Weight Watchers

Collinsville

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Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • Sunday:
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 5pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • Closed

Info

  • 2540 Virginia Avenue
  • Collinsville VA
  • (276) 647-1112
  • collinsville@brrl.lib.va.us
  • Branch manager: Kim Martin

Events

Map

History

The Collinsville Library, located at 2540 Virginia Avenue in Collinsville, provides an open, friendly, and relaxed atmosphere, where visitors can browse books, videos, music CD’s, and newspapers, as well as use the computers. Having moved to the new location in December 2001, the library still has an air of newness. The staff maintains a friendly and helpful attitude to all who visit.

Collinsville Library has the distinction of being the first branch of the Blue Ridge Regional Library to be established. In 1972, the library, located in the city of Martinsville, became a joint city-county operation and the name was changed to Martinsville-Henry County Public Library. In 1973 and 1974, it became evident that service would have to be expanded to accommodate the residents of Collinsville and the surrounding area. Nora Jenkins, Mattie Thornton of the Collinsville Literacy Society and others met with the Henry County Board of Supervisors to make an appeal for a library in the Collinsville area. In 1974, the Martinsville-Henry County Public Library received federal grant funds to develop countywide service and Henry County supplemented the grant with a large appropriation. The Collinsville Branch Library opened in a vacant storefront in the Collinsville Shopping Center on August 23, 1974. Because of this new branch library, the National Association of Counties cited Henry County for offering improved service to its citizens. The first three cards issued by the new Collinsville Branch were to Irene Snapp, Jack Dalton – both deceased, and to Nora Jenkins – who is still a regular and active patron of the Collinsville Library.

In January of 1992, the Collinsville Branch Library had become one of the few remaining tenants in the Collinsville Shopping Center. The location lacked visibility as well as space needed for the increased usage. On January 21, 1992, the Collinsville Library moved to a new location at 128 Virginia Avenue. The rented building was a former bowling alley. (The building had also housed a hardware store and a video store.) Needless to say, some unusual adaptations had to be planned and designed to create library space. This nearly doubled the size of the old location and offered easy access and visibility to the library.

By 1998, the Collinsville Library again had outgrown its space. Additional computers, shelving units, and increased materials had been added to offer full library service to the residents. Children’s programs were held in a small area at the back of the library amid the rows of shelves. Despite crowded and outdated conditions, the Collinsville branch consistently showed increased circulation and customer visits. After several options were explored, the Library Board of Trustees determined the most economical solution would be to relocate in a leased facility.

In May 2001, a space became available in the old Helig-Meyers Building. The Library Board instructed Branch Manager Sandra Shell and other library staff to plan the layout and design of the new facility and to oversee the remodeling project. From May to December, volunteers spent many hours doing the remodeling – from removing wall paper to painting to installing shelves to collecting empty boxes for the actual move. Thanks to many, many hours of volunteer work, the building renovation was completed by November. One special volunteer was Ralph Hubbard of Collinsville who spent many hours in the remodeling effort, from cleaning, to painting, to moving books, and many other tasks. His help was invaluable in Collinsville’s move to its newest location. Many aspects of the community became involved in the project: local businesses donated materials and man-power, financial contributions were received, individuals- volunteers and library staff -spent time working at the new location, and the Friends of the Library held special fund-raising events.

On December 8, 2001, the Collinsville Library’s opening ceremonies were held in its new building. The library is a large, open area with good lighting, easy access, and a comfortable setting. With almost three times the space of the former location, the facility has numerous computer stations, a special children’s reading area, a large meeting room available for public use, a small office area for tutoring, as well as offices and kitchen area for the staff. There are patron work tables, comfortable chairs, and many other comforts for users of the library. The Collinsville Library has been well received and used by the area residents.

Community is important to the staff of the Collinsville Library. Frequently, there are special programs held at the library for the public. One popular reoccurring event is the “History Day at Collinsville Library”. Held every four months, this is an opportunity for show and tell. People bring in items to display or to seek help on identification, or just to hear local history buffs discuss the history of the area.

Frequently there are special programs for children, such as the annual Fun Day held by the Collinsville Jaycettes. Also popular are the visits by the Martinsville-based baseball team. In addition, children’s story times are held each week, with stories, activities, and crafts.

Collinsville Library has an excellent area for art exhibits and displays. This has been a popular avenue for bringing in local artists and collectors. The exhibits are scheduled two months at a time, and there is usually a waiting list of potential exhibitors.

Current staff members include librarian and Branch Manager Sandra Shell. “I love my work. It is very rewarding to meet people and to offer assistance when needed. I am proud of the Collinsville Library and what it has to offer.” Collinsville is fortunate to have excellent staff members who exhibit a strong desire to assist the patrons and provide excellent service to the community. Regular volunteers have been a tremendous asset to the operations of the library and helping with the many responsibilities of circulation and services. The Friends of the Library have constantly been a supporting organization to the Collinsville Library with financial assistance, manual labor, and volunteers.

The Collinsville Library is a wonderful place to visit. The staff has as a priority to assist and help people. When asked why they like to work in a library, all the staff agree it is because they like to help people. Whether it is finding a book, or other information, or giving assistance at the computer, the staff finds it very rewarding to be able meet the needs of the patrons.

Available Resources

Newspapers
  • Martinsville Bulletin
  • Richmond Times Dispatch
  • Roanoke Times
  • USA Today
  • Wall Street Journal
Magazines
  • American Patchwork & Quilting
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • Birds & Blooms
  • Blue Ridge Country
  • Car & Driver
  • Consumer Reports
  • Crochet World
  • Diabetes Forecast
  • Essence
  • Family Circle
  • Field & Stream
  • Fine Woodworking
  • Franklin News Post
  • Good Housekeeping
  • Guide Posts
  • Health
  • HGTV Magazine
  • Highlights for Children
  • J-14
  • Kiplingers Magazine
  • National Geographic
  • Outdoor Life
  • People Weekly
  • Popular Science
  • Prevention
  • Rachel Ray Every Day
  • Redbook
  • Southern Living
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Weight Watchers
  • Womans Day

Patrick Co.

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Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • Sunday:
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 8pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • Closed

Info

Events

Map

History

Lady Louise Clark was our first librarian and served from the establishment of the Patrick County Public Library in 1941 until 1972. Most of the history below is from an interview by Mary Britt (from the Reynolds Homestead) conducted with Ms. Clark in 1980 about the early years of the Library.

During the early years, the Patrick Branch had help from local clubs such as the Garden Club, the Book Club, and the Woman's Club for things such as landscaping the garden and grounds, donating blinds for the windows, carpeting, and driveway improvements. Lady Clark also commented that in reviewing some papers of the Stuart Book Club, she noted that M. R. Taylor was given permission by the Board of Supervisors to clean out the basement of the courthouse to form a reading room for the young men of the community. This was during the 1920's. The Book Club later started a book rental service and then later donated the entire book collection to the Library. This was almost 20 years before the Library was officially begun.

In February of 1941, the county supervisors were approached by Commonwealth Attorney, E.P. Burton, notifying them that an anonymous person wanted to donate a library and a collection of books. The anonymous donor turned out to be Mr. David Bruce, who at the time, served in the Virginia General Assembly. He later became ambassador to Great Britain, West Germany, and China. (He gave 10 libraries to some of the poorer counties in southside Virginia.)

The supervisors and town council decided on a location and Mrs. Shockley sold the lot to the county for $1,000. The beginning years were financially lean ones with a budget of only $2,000. During Children's Book Week, the Woman's Club had the children "tag" people for donations of 25 cents or 50 cents. The "tags" were similar to today's "I Voted", or "I Gave Blood" tags. These donations were used to aid in buying children's books. During the early war years of World War Two gas was rationed, so the fund-raising efforts were concentrated in the town, making the library seem more for the town of Stuart than the county of Patrick in the beginning. It became more of a county library when the bookmobile came into service during 1946. The bookmobile, along with a collection of books, was provided by an appropriation from the State, if the library budget was raised from $2,000 to $3,000. A forward-thinking school superintendent realized that the one and two room schools throughout the county which had no libraries could use this service. As soon as the bookmobile was put into service, circulation greatly increased. In those days the bookmobile stopped at the schools, stores, community stops and community centers. The bookmobile went out 5 days weekly, but without enough budget to operate both the library and the bookmobile, the library opened at about 3:30 each day. They had volunteer help at this time from the National Youth Administration (a part of the Works Progress Administration.) In 1948 Carl Conner drove the bookmobile. He was paid $4.00 daily and went out into the county three days a week.

Around 1954 the Patrick Library merged with Franklin County Library, which was also an Ambassador David Bruce library. Patrick was considered the "home" library since Franklin County did not have a librarian. The merged library was named alphabetically, Franklin-Patrick. The bookmobile was split between the two libraries and the bookmobile was kept at each locality for two weeks out of the month. When Franklin County decided to go it alone, around June, 1974, Patrick County along with Martinsville became the Blue Ridge Regional Library system.

Our current building was built after a large fundraising effort in the late 1980s. In 1991, the Library moved to the current site at 116 West Blue Ridge Street. Our beautiful building was bought with the help of hundreds of donations, over 160 of the people and organizations are named on our “giving tree” plaque in the foyer of the building. The building was given to the county to maintain and house the Patrick County Library and Historical Museum.

Another large fundraising campaign ($187,000) was needed to purchase our latest bookmobile which began service in May 2019. Currently the bookmobile stops at all of the elementary schools and various other locations in Patrick County. Stops include Ararat, Claudville, Meadows of Dan, Woolwine, Charity and Patrick Springs, seeing over 1000 patrons a month during the school year.

Available Resources

Newspapers
  • Enterprise
  • Henry County Enterprise
  • Martinsville Bulletin
  • Roanoke Times
  • Wall Street Journal
Magazines
  • Ask
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • Birds & Blooms
  • Blue Ridge Country
  • Consumer Reports
  • Country Woman
  • Eating Well
  • Good Housekeeping
  • Health
  • Mother Earth News
  • National Geographic Kids
  • Southern Living
  • Spider
  • Taste of Home
  • Womans Day

Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • Sunday:
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 12pm - 8pm
  • Closed
  • 10am - 6pm
  • 10am - 5pm
  • 10am - 2pm
  • Closed

Info

  • 900 Vista View Lane
  • PO Box 1210
  • Ridgeway VA
  • (276) 956-1828
  • ridgeway@brrl.lib.va.us
  • Branch manager: Amy Bunn

Events

Map

History

For more than a decade, residents of Ridgeway had been interested in building a branch library to serve the needs of the rural community in their town. But each time interest ran high, the answer was always the same – lack of money, and lack of strong, willing leadership for such a project. A professional fund-raiser was employed for a capital campaign to build the Patrick County Library and the Blue Ridge Regional Library Board decided this might be the time for Ridgeway to begin raising money with the fund-raiser managing both efforts. With the assistance of the library director, Betty Wooldridge, the Henry County Board of Supervisors was persuaded to purchase a one-acre lot for the future site of the proposed Ridgeway Branch Library.

A feasibility study was made by the fund-raiser, and to the utter astonishment of a Ridgeway delegation attending, he recommended to the library board that the Ridgeway project be abandoned because of a lack of interest in the community. This almost amounted to a death knell for the dream, but as a special favor, the board granted a month’s reprieve on the final decision.

A small group of five civic-minded ladies, including Elizabeth Wood Lester, Ruth Pace, Pat Walmsley, Sandra Cox, and Mary McGee, literally took to the streets to put the decision once and for all before the people. In four weeks’ time, they were able to convince the board that this time they would succeed. Permission was granted and the campaign began – without the help of the professional fund-raiser!

Dr. Robert L. Mason, public spirited and lifelong resident, (Ridgeway’s mayor for 50 years and son of Dr. Drewry Mason, for whom the school is named) gave a major gift to start the drive and the building is named for him. Cheered by his generosity, the workers began calling on businesses and industry but met with disappointment and frustration. The stock market’s plummet in October, 1987, caused a downturn in the economy and closed down that sector for contributions. (A number of businesses and industries did support the drive, however.)

Not to be defeated, the group, armed with only a typed sheet describing the proposed building, knocked on doors, talked, cajoled, promised, persuaded, and literally begged families in a radius of several miles to support the project. “I fell in ditches, got covered with beggar’s lice, was chased by dogs, almost suffered a heat stroke one hot summer night, and almost froze in the wintertime while canvassing for funds,” said Mary McGee who, with two or three others of the committee worked almost every day for two years to raise the $500,000 plus.

The majority of pledges ranged from $10 to $1,000 with many young families budgeting each month and systematically making payments for as long as three years to fulfill their pledges. Ground-breaking was held in September 1989 with a large number of supporters and well-wishers standing in drizzling rain for the ceremony. The library opened on June 9, 1990, coinciding with the Town of Ridgeway Centennial Celebration. The first branch librarian was Roseanne Goble who later became a state lobbyist for libraries in Kansas.

In 1993 the Ridgeway Garden Club won both district and state awards for the Centennial Flower Garden located on the grounds. Each year a tree is planted on Arbor Day with the help of the students of Ridgeway Elementary School.

The 5,000 square-foot, full-service Ridgeway Branch is located at 900 Vista View Lane in Ridgeway, Virginia.

Available Resources

Newspapers
  • Eden Daily News
  • Greensboro News and Record
  • Martinsville Bulletin
  • Roanoke Times
Magazines
  • American Girl
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • Blue Ridge Country
  • Cat Fancy
  • Consumer Reports
  • Ebony
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Family Handyman
  • Health
  • J-14
  • Nickelodeon
  • People Weekly
  • Prevention
  • Seventeen
  • Southern Living
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Taste of Home
  • Web MD
  • Zoobooks

Bookmobile

View all locations

116 West Blue Ridge St | PO Box 787 | Stuart, VA
(276) 694-3352 | bookmobile@brrl.lib.va.us

Info


  • Stuart VA
  • PO Box 787
  • (276) 694-3352
  • bookmobile@brrl.lib.va.us
  • Branch manager: Gayle Wagoner


  • The Patrick County Bookmobile has been in service since 1946, providing crucial access to library books to local schools since the days of one room schools.


    Current scheduling for the bookmobile indicates stops to 7 elementary schools, and various other locations, which last from 30 minutes to 2 hours. Stops include Ararat to Claudville to Meadows of Dan to Woolwine to Charity to Patrick Springs, serving over 1000 people a month, with average circulation of approx. 3000, traveling approximately 8,000 miles a year.


  • Winter/Spring 2023 Bookmobile Schedule

Schedule

History

Lady Louise Clark was our first librarian and served from the establishment of the Patrick County Public Library in 1941 until 1972. Most of the history below is from an interview by Mary Britt (from the Reynolds Homestead) conducted with Ms. Clark in 1980 about the early years of the Library.

During the early years, the Patrick Branch had help from local clubs such as the Garden Club, the Book Club, and the Woman's Club for things such as landscaping the garden and grounds, donating blinds for the windows, carpeting, and driveway improvements. Lady Clark also commented that in reviewing some papers of the Stuart Book Club, she noted that M. R. Taylor was given permission by the Board of Supervisors to clean out the basement of the courthouse to form a reading room for the young men of the community. This was during the 1920's. The Book Club later started a book rental service and then later donated the entire book collection to the Library. This was almost 20 years before the Library was officially begun.

In February of 1941, the county supervisors were approached by Commonwealth Attorney, E.P. Burton, notifying them that an anonymous person wanted to donate a library and a collection of books. The anonymous donor turned out to be Mr. David Bruce, who at the time, served in the Virginia General Assembly. He later became ambassador to Great Britain, West Germany, and China. (He gave 10 libraries to some of the poorer counties in southside Virginia.)

The supervisors and town council decided on a location and Mrs. Shockley sold the lot to the county for $1,000. The beginning years were financially lean ones with a budget of only $2,000. During Children's Book Week, the Woman's Club had the children "tag" people for donations of 25 cents or 50 cents. The "tags" were similar to today's "I Voted", or "I Gave Blood" tags. These donations were used to aid in buying children's books. During the early war years of World War Two gas was rationed, so the fund-raising efforts were concentrated in the town, making the library seem more for the town of Stuart than the county of Patrick in the beginning. It became more of a county library when the bookmobile came into service during 1946. The bookmobile, along with a collection of books, was provided by an appropriation from the State, if the library budget was raised from $2,000 to $3,000. A forward-thinking school superintendent realized that the one and two room schools throughout the county which had no libraries could use this service. As soon as the bookmobile was put into service, circulation greatly increased. In those days the bookmobile stopped at the schools, stores, community stops and community centers. The bookmobile went out 5 days weekly, but without enough budget to operate both the library and the bookmobile, the library opened at about 3:30 each day. They had volunteer help at this time from the National Youth Administration (a part of the Works Progress Administration.) In 1948 Carl Conner drove the bookmobile. He was paid $4.00 daily and went out into the county three days a week.

Around 1954 the Patrick Library merged with Franklin County Library, which was also an Ambassador David Bruce library. Patrick was considered the "home" library since Franklin County did not have a librarian. The merged library was named alphabetically, Franklin-Patrick. The bookmobile was split between the two libraries and the bookmobile was kept at each locality for two weeks out of the month. When Franklin County decided to go it alone, around June, 1974, Patrick County along with Martinsville became the Blue Ridge Regional Library system.

Our current building was built after a large fundraising effort in the late 1980s. In 1991, the Library moved to the current site at 116 West Blue Ridge Street. Our beautiful building was bought with the help of hundreds of donations, over 160 of the people and organizations are named on our “giving tree” plaque in the foyer of the building. The building was given to the county to maintain and house the Patrick County Library and Historical Museum.

Another large fundraising campaign ($187,000) was needed to purchase our latest bookmobile which began service in May 2019. Currently the bookmobile stops at all of the elementary schools and various other locations in Patrick County. Stops include Ararat, Claudville, Meadows of Dan, Woolwine, Charity and Patrick Springs, seeing over 1000 patrons a month during the school year.

Available Resources

  • Animal Wellness
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • Blue Ridge Country
  • Consumer Reports
  • Family Handyman
  • Fine Gardening